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The history Locomotives in World

The first locomotive engine designed to run upon rails was constructed in 1803, under the direction of Richard Trevithick, a Cornish mine captain in South Wales. Though crudely and peculiarly made, it possessed all of the characteristics of the modern locomotive with the exception of the multi-tubular boiler. The locomotive had a return-flue boiler 60 inches long, and two pairs of driving wheels - each 52 inches in diameter. The power was furnished by one cylinder, 54 inches long and 8 inches in diameter.

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Penydarren 1804

Penidarren locomotive 1804

The very first steam-powered railway locomotive in the world. Designed and built  by the Cornish engineer Richard Trevithick, this remarkable contraption was put to work on the Pen-y-Darren tramway in South Wales in 1804 - no less than 21 years before the opening of the Stockton & Darlington Railway. The locomotive bore no name or number, but is referred to simply as the Pen-y-Darren engine (or Penydarren for short).                               Continue reading >>

Puffing Billy 1814

Puffing Billy locomotive 1814

This is one of the two oldest railway locomotives still in existence anywhere in the world, the other being its sister, Wylam Dilly. Almost every railway history book ever published states that Dilly is the older of the two, but we can reveal that 21st century research undertaken by Edinburgh Museum expert John Crompton has shown that the opposite is in fact the case.
He has conducted an unprecedentedly-thorough physical examination of the two locomotives and found irrefutable evidence that the boiler of
Dilly demonstrates a process of learning by experience from the construction methods used on Billy. As a result, the Science Museum and Early Railways Conference have now changed the date of Dillys construction to “circa 1815", meaning it comes after its 1814-built sister, not before.
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Locomotion No1 1825

Locomotion No1 1825

The loco was designed by George Stephenson and built at the Robert Stephenson & Co works in Newcastle, hauling the historic inaugural train on the S&D on September 27, 1825. (There had been an earlier public passenger-carrying railway, at Oystcrmouth, in South Wales, but that used horse traction).
Despite a fatal boiler explosion three years later and conversion to stationary engine status in 1841, Locomotion
remained in use until 1857 and was then preserved, firstly at Hopetown, Darlington, then on Darlington Bank Top station (1892 to 1975) and finally at the towns North Road museum, where it is on long-tern loan from the National Railway Museum.
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Rocket 1829

Rocket 1829

In the minds of people who had never travelled faster than a galloping horse, the engine must have appeared to go like a rocket. Designed by Robert Stephenson and aided by his father George, the  Rocket 0-2-2 was built in 1829 and was a pioneer in more senses than one, for it was the first to combine multi-tubular boiler, blastpipe and direct drive from piston to wheel - all features that were to last until the very end of the steam age.
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Lion locomotive 1838

Lion locomotive 1838

Lion was for many years the oldest surviving working locomotive in the world and has been made even more famous by its role in that greatly-loved film The Titfield Thunderbolt.
Built by Todd, Kitson and Laird
in 1838 for the Liverpool & Manchester Railway, it served that pioneering line faithfully until withdrawal in 1859, after which it was purchased by the Mersey Docks & Harbour Board for use as a stationary boiler.
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Highland Goods locomotive 1894

Highland Goods locomotive 1894

The most numerous tender engine type for mixed and passenger work in Britain was the 4-6-0 yet the first didn't appear until 1894, and then only in the most northerly reaches of the British Isles. It was designed by Highland Railway loco superintendent David Jones and built by Sharp Stewart 8c Co, of Glasgow.

Little could Jones have realised as he chose the wheel arrangement for this humble goods engine class that he was starting a trend that would lead to ‘Stars’, ‘Castles’, ‘Kings’, ‘Nelsons’, ‘Claughtons’, ‘Scots’, ‘Jubilees’, B12s, B1s et al. For, by the time the last BR 5MT No. 73154 had emerged from Derby Works in June 1957, the railways of Britain had seen no fewer than 75 different types of ‘ten-wheelers’ operated by 13 different companies.
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