Lincoln 1946


Lincoln 1946


Lincoln 1946

  • Origin United State of America
  • Engine 4,998 cc, V12
  • Top speed 92 mph (148 km/h)

Lincoln, Ford's upmarket brand, was still making pre-war-styled cars in 1946. They were fine cars, but the public was looking for something more modern. Lincolns were the last Ford Motor Company products to arrive in showrooms after the war ended, appearing in January 1946. As they were the highest priced, lowest volume products, there was apparently not a great rush to get them onto the market. Like all manufacturers, Lincoln would sell every car it could build for the time being.

All Lincolns continued to be powered by the smooth and quiet V12 engine. The 305 CID, 130 horsepower engine was a leftover from the classic 1930s period, but it was perfectly suited for the large, luxurious Lincoln. In fact, a 1946 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet was selected to serve as the pace car for the first Indianapolis 500 race run after World War II, on May 30, 1946. Styling changes from the 1942 models were mostly limited to a new grille on all models, made up of an upper and lower section of chrome grids. The upper section, which was centered between the headlights and directly below the hood opening, consisted of four rows and three columns that followed the curvature of the front edge of the hood. The lower grille sat just above a larger bumper, and was made up of three rows and ten columns across. Turn signals and parking lamps were mounted in square bezels on each side of the headlamps. A hood emblem and hood ornament topped off the revisions.

Bodyside trim for Lincoln followed a minimalist approach, with a beltline molding, window surround moldings, and rocker panel moldings making up the bulk of the trim. Series designation of "Lincoln" or "Lincoln Continental" was in script on the side of the hood. All models continued the pushbutton style door openers, a unique Lincoln feature. The Continental continued to be a custom, handcrafted automobile that often was specifically built for the buyer. Distinguishing features for the Continental included the lack of running boards, a square, flat windshield, and formal roofline on the coupe. The Cabriolet, or convertible, continued to lack rear side windows, giving it a closed in, formal and private appeal with the top up.

Running boards continued to be used on the Lincoln, but were enclosed by flared bodywork at the bottom of the doors. Also, the regular Lincoln line used more of a fastback style body, as this was the popular design of the period. Interiors were similar to other luxury cars with broadcloth and leather combinations most commonly used. Open cars used all leather upholstery. Instrument panels were somewhat "Ford-like," meaning relatively flat with gauges centered around the driver area, but carried slightly more trim than Ford or Mercury models.