Lagonda 3-litre 1929


Lagonda 3-litre 1929


Lagonda 3-litre 1929

  • Origin United Kingdom
  • Engine 2,931 cc, straight-six
  • Top speed 83 mph (134 km/h)

Lagonda produced sporting cars with seven-bearing engines that made them smooth-running and long-lasting. Some had sporting coachwork, other were sedans or limousines. The 2-litre Lagonda first appeared in 1925 known as the 14/60, which was designed by Arthur Davidson.

This was a major step for the company moving from production of the noted 11.9 HP "light car" models of the early 1920's. The 2 litre was rated at 12.8 HP with 4 cylinders 72x120mm (1,954cc). The aim was to focus production on superior upmarket touring cars. The engine with its twin high camshafts provided new levels of performance along side superior quality engineering, reflecting in reliability. This concept of design was the heart of Lagonda production through to the 1930's. By 1927 various modifications had been made relating to camshaft design, lubrication, connecting rods, brakes and chassis design and strengthening. This became the two-litre high chassis speed model. By 1929, the new body styling creating a lower sleeker profile brought the announcement of the low chassis model, with new front axel design, lower cast bulkhead plate, resulting with lower bonnet line and windscreen. By 1930 with further development to find more power from this engine, car number 9711 (Pl 1240) was fitted with a powerplus rotary vane supercharger. PL 1240 was the actual development car and became the demonstrator as tested by "The Motor" and "Autocar" of the time.