Chrysler New Yorker 1960


Chrysler New Yorker 1960


Chrysler New Yorker 1960

  • Origin United States of America
  • Engine 6,767 cc, V8
  • Top speed 122 mph (196 km/h)

In 1960 Chrysler began producing its first monocoque construction bodyshells. The New Yorker was the longest and most luxurious, with 350 bhp to speed it along the freeways. All new 1960 Chrysler models were built with unitbody construction.

This meant that all major body components were welded to the frame instead of bolted, with the ensuing effect to be more rigidity and less noise. While it was an excellent attempt at modernization, and it did have the desired effect upon improving the cars and their quality, sales gains were made with a massive advertising effort. Unfortunately, the debacle over the 1957-1958 quality issues far overshadowed any good product that was coming out of Chrysler during this period. Styling for the new bodies featured the mighty Chrysler 300's grille on all models, albeit with some modifications.

The Windsor and Saratoga featured a crosshatch style grille, while the New Yorker had a horizontal bar grille. Out back, a more slender tailfin seemingly aimed higher than ever towards the sky. On the Windsor, a full-length body molding ran from the trailing edge of the front wheel opening, back above the rear wheel opening, and ending at a point at the top edge of the rear bumper. On the Saratoga, this molding was available slightly larger with a paint accent. This piece of trim was not on the New Yorker, but the top line car did sport a full-length rocker panel molding that included wheel opening trim.

Interiors featured a Chrysler-exclusive, three-dimensional instrument cluster coined "electro-luminescent Astra-Dome" instrumentation. This new ball-type cluster housed all gauges on three planes, and all were backlit, to give one of the most unusual instrument layouts of this period. It was surprisingly easy to read, even at night.