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Enrico Fermi

Inventors and scientists

Enrico Fermi
Born:
September 29, 1901, Rome, Italy
Died:
November 28, 1954, Chicago, U.S.

Italian-born American scientist Enrico Fermi was one of the chief architects of the nuclear age. He developed the mathematical statistics required to clarify a large class of subatomic phenomena, explored nuclear transformations caused by neutrons, and directed the first controlled chain reaction involving nuclear fission.

He was awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize for Physics, and the Enrico Fermi Award of the U.S. Department of Energy is given in his honour. Fermilab, the National Accelerator Laboratory, in Illinois, is named for him, as is fermium, element number 100.

Enrico Fermi

European Career

In 1924 Fermi took a position as a lecturer in mathematical physics at the University of Florence in Italy. His early research was in general relativity, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics. Examples of gas degeneracy (appearance of unexpected phenomena) had been known, and some cases were explained by Bose-Einstein statistics, which describes the behaviour of subatomic particles known as bosons. Between 1926 and 1927, Fermi and the English physicist P.A.M. Dirac independently developed new statistics, now known as Fermi-Dirac statistics, to handle the subatomic particles that obey the Pauli exclusion principle; these particles, which include  electrons, protons, neutrons (not yet discovered), and other particles with half-integer spin, are now known as fermions.

In 1927 Fermi became a full professor at the University of Rome. In 1929 Fermi, as Italy’s first professor of theoretical physics and a rising star in European science, was named by Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini to his new Accademia d’Italia, a position that included a substantial salary (much larger than that for any ordinary university position), a uniform, and a title (“Excellency”). During the late 1920s, Fermi changed his focus to the more primitively developed field of nuclear physics. He began to study the neutrino, an almost undetectable particle that had been postulated a few years earlier by the Austrian-born physicist Wolfgang Pauli.

This led to Fermi’s recognition that beta decay from radioactive particles was a manifestation of the weak force, one of the four known universal forces (the others being gravitation, electromagnetism, and the strong force).

In the 1930s Fermi reasoned that the neutral neutron would be an ideal projectile with which to bombard charged nuclei in order to initiate such reactions. With his colleagues, Fermi subjected more than 60 elements to neutron bombardment, using a Geiger-Müller counter to detect emissions and conducting chemical analyses to determine the new radioactive isotopes produced. Along the way, they found by chance that neutrons that had been slowed in their velocity often were more effective. When testing uranium they observed several activities, but they could not interpret what occurred. Some scientists thought that they had produced transuranium elements, namely elements higher than uranium at atomic number 92. The issue was not resolved until 1938, when it was revealed that the uranium had split and the several radioactivities detected were from fission fragments.

Fermi was little interested in politics, yet he grew increasingly uncomfortable with the fascist politics of his homeland. When Italy adopted the anti-Semitic policies of its ally, Nazi Germany, a crisis occurred, for Fermi’s wife, Laura, was Jewish. The award of the 1938 Nobel Prize for Physics serendipitously provided the excuse for the family to travel abroad, and the prize money helped to establish them in the United States.

American Career

Fermi began his new life at Columbia University, in New York City. Within weeks of his arrival, news that uranium could fission astounded the physics community. Scientists had known for many years that nuclei could disgorge small chunks, such as alpha particles, beta particles, protons, and neutrons, either in natural radioactivity or upon bombardment by a projectile. However, they had never seen a nucleus split almost in two. The implications were both exciting and ominous, and they were recognized widely. When uranium fissioned, some mass was converted to energy, according to Albert  Einstein’s  famous  formula E = mc2. Uranium also emitted a few neutrons in addition to the larger fragments. If these neutrons could be slowed to maximize their efficiency, they could participate in a controlled chain reaction to produce energy; that is, a nuclear reactor could be built.

The same neutrons traveling at their initial high speed could also participate in an uncontrolled chain reaction, liberating an enormous amount of energy through many generations of fission events, all within a fraction of a second; that is, an atomic bomb could be built. Working primarily with the Hungarian-born physicist Leo Szilard, Fermi constructed experimental arrangements of neutron sources and pieces of uranium. They sought to determine the necessary size of a structure, the best material to use as a moderator to slow neutrons, the necessary purity of all components (so neutrons would not be lost), and the best substance for forming control rods that could absorb neutrons to slow or stop the reaction.

When the United States  entered World War II in December 1941, nuclear research was consolidated to some degree. Fermi had built a series of “piles,” as he called them, at Columbia. Now he moved to the University of Chicago, where he continued to construct piles in a space under the stands of the football field. The final structure, a flattened sphere about 7.5 metres (25 feet) in diameter, contained 380 tons of graphite blocks as the moderator and 6 tons of uranium metal and 40 tons of uranium oxide as the fuel, distributed in a careful pattern. The pile went “critical” on Dec. 2, 1942, proving that a nuclear reaction could be initiated, controlled, and stopped. Chicago Pile-1, as it was called, was the first prototype for several large nuclear reactors constructed at Hanford, Wash., where plutonium, a man-made element heavier  than uranium, was produced. Plutonium also could fission and thus was another route to the atomic bomb.

In 1944 Fermi became an American citizen and moved to Los Alamos, N.M., where physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer led the Manhattan Project’s laboratory, whose mission was to fashion weapons out of the rare uranium-235 isotope and plutonium. When the first plutonium bomb was tested on July 16, 1945, near Alamogordo, N.M., Fermi ingeniously made a rough calculation of its explosive energy by noting how far slips of paper were blown from the vertical. After  the  war  ended,  Fermi  accepted a permanent position at the University of Chicago, where he subsequently redirected his sights on reactions at higher energies, a field called elementary particle physics, or high-energy physics.

However, Fermi went for a time back to Los Alamos to assist in the development of fusion weapons, however with the hope that they might prove impossible to construct. Fermi primarily investigated subatomic particles, particularly pi mesons and muons, after returning to Chicago. He was also known as a superb teacher, and many of his lectures are still in print. During his later years he raised a question now known as the Fermi paradox: “Where is everybody?” He was asking why no extraterrestrial civilizations seemed to be around to be detected, despite the great size and age of the universe. He  pessimistically thought that the answer might involve nuclear annihilation.

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